The Global Economic Governance (GEG) Africa programme is a policy research and stakeholder engagement programme to strengthen the influence of pro-poor African coalitions at global economic governance fora.

Trade

The WTO has reached a critical impasse; the Doha Development Agenda has effectively come to an end and further progress at the multilateral level is not in sight. The ways in which the new mega-regional and plurilateral negotiations unfold will directly affect African regional development, and indirectly affect poor communities across the continent.

To participate meaningfully in negotiations, African trade policymakers need to understand the key issues and proposals at play. The GEG Africa programme will work with policymakers to research and articulate possible positions on priority policy issues that account for South African interests, those of other African countries, and the poor.

GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, November 2018
“Business is down”, this is Lillian’s rather dejected response as I browse through her curios store on a side street of Mombasa’s old town. It’s true, the streets are largely deserted, but I do see something I didn’t expect – there are quite a few small groups of tourists who seem to be local Kenyans, or at least from the region, as I hear bargaining in Swahili.
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, October 2018
GEGAfrica Event Report, October 2018
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, October 2018
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, October 2018
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, October 2018
GEGAfrica Event Report, September 2018
As a complement to our previous blog in which we looked at a range of policy instruments to support the enabling-market approach to digital policy formation, this blog delves into some of the instruments that developing countries can use when adopting a more interventionist policy approach – the ultimate goal being ‘digital catch-up’.
In our previous blog, we looked at the two broad policy approaches that developing countries could adopt to enhance their digital preparedness: an enabling approach and a digital catch-up approach. Linked to these two approaches are various policy instruments that can be used to steer the policy implementation process.
Embracing digitalisation is not an option for countries. The digital era has arrived and its effects will increasingly be felt as time goes by. Whether the developing world will be able to grasp the unfolding opportunities and not be overwhelmed by the challenges will depend on the policies that countries formulate and the diligence with which they implement them. Left to its own devices, the digital economy will simply widen the digital divide and exacerbate countries’ economic problems.
GEGAfrica Event Report, September 2018
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, August 2018
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, August 2018
Despite more than 60 anti-corruption commitments from G20 leaders in the last few years, there is little evidence of any real progress.
Trade expansion will likely slow further in the third quarter of 2018 according to the WTO’s latest World Trade Outlook Indicator (WTOI) released on 9 August.
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, July 2018
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, July 2018  Download - English
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, April 2018
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, February 2018
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, February 2018
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, January 2018
As Argentina takes over the G20 Presidency this month, it is becoming clearer that it will continue the focus on sustainability. Fostering the transformation of the global economy towards sustainability is one of the commitments made by the G20 towards implementing Agenda 2030, a focus of the last two G20 Presidencies. Integrating Global Value Chains (GVCs) are a critical part of achieving sustainability, especially through the incorporation of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).
Monday, 11 December 2017 14:29

E-Commerce and the WTO a Developmental Agenda?

Written by
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, December 2017
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, December 2017
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, November 2017
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, November 2017
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, October 2017
Wednesday, 30 August 2017 16:01

E-Commerce Country Case Study: South Africa

Written by
GEGAfrica Discussion Paper, August 2017
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, June 2017
GEGAfrica Policy Briefing, July 2017

  • Location Pretoria
GEG Africa organised a multi-stakeholder study group meeting on “GVCS, SMES and Sustainability Standards”.

  • Location Pretoria
Workshop: Making SACU Trade Better - The Role of a Regional Development Fund brought together various stakeholders from international and local spheres to discuss SACU trade.

  • Location Pretoria
The workshop brought together various international and domestic stakeholders to discuss the issues surrounding e-commerce in Africa.
Dear Editors and Journalists,
In the final quarter of 2016 South Africa participated in two critical global economic governance summits as the lone continental representative: the 11th G20 summit hosted by China and the 8th BRICS summit hosted by India.

  • Location Pretoria
E-commerce has evolved the global trade landscape, opening up trade to online platforms and extending the reach to a larger connected global market. On 26 October 2016, GEG Africa hosted a study group, reaching out to key stakeholders involved in e-commerce trade and regulation. The discussions will enhance the recommendations in our upcoming Discussion Paper and Policy Brief.
Hot on the heels of the recent G20 Summit in China, the 8th BRICS Summit will be held on 15-16 October 2016 in Goa, India. When South Africa hosted the Summit in 2013, it emphasised that BRICS needed to be relevant to Africa’s development priorities. The ambitious intentions stated in the BRICS Summit Declarations and Action Plans need to translate into actions that deliver tangible outcomes. Therefore, what can the African continent expect to derive from this year’s BRICS Summit?
The 11th annual G-20 Summit took place in Hangzhou, China in September. The theme for China's presidency was, ‘Towards an Innovative, Invigorated, Interconnected and Inclusive World Economy’.
On 4-5 September, 2016, G-20 leaders will meet in Hangzhou, China. Global macroeconomic and financial developments traditionally dominate the agenda. The global economy remains mired in the economic doldrums, so this year there will be plenty to discuss. Brexit is likely to add further spice.
Dear Editors and Journalists,

  • Location Pretoria
On 23 May 2016, the GEG Africa programme hosted a workshop on 'Global Value Chains and Small, Medium Enterprises: What Role for the G20?'

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