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  • A fresh approach to credit ratings

    Over the past few years there have been discussions amongst the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries to open up their own rating agency that will compete with the 'big three' credit rating agencies - that is, Standard and Poor’s (S&P), Moody’s and the Fitch Group. S&P and Moody’s are based in the US.

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  • South Africa’s Place in an Economic Global Order

    In December, my colleagues from SAIIA and the University of Pretoria brought together South African colleagues and international experts for a conference on “Alliances Beyond BRICS: South Africa’s Role in Global Economic Governance”.
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  • Third Annual African G-20 Conference

    Dr Bheki Mfeka, Special Economic Adviser to the President, and South African G-20 Sous Sherpa, today addressed the Third Annual African G-20 Conference. His full speech is now available online.

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  • The G-20 Tax Agenda and Africa's Needs

    The importance of taxation goes far beyond providing income to finance the public sector, investments, and the basic needs of the population. The establishment of states is partly attributed to the tax system which has also contributed to promoting the state’s legitimacy, strengthening democracy, as well as to creating economic well-being for the general population.

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  • SAIIA Podcast 28: The BRICS New Development Bank

    In July 2014, the BRICS grouping (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), announced the creation of a new, US$100 billion New Development Bank to lend money to developing nations for investments. There is much speculation about the role the Bank might play, and the motivations of the BRICS members in establishing it.

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GEGAfrica Discussions

  • Nene faces toughest test yet
    Written by
    Nene faces toughest test yet South African Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene is facing his biggest baptism of fire yet when he delivers his maiden National Budget speech on Wednesday, as the country desperately needs him to plug the gap between national spending and revenue. South Africa’s debt trend is not sustainable.
  • Where is the ‘A’ in ‘BRICS’?
    Written by
    Where is the ‘A’ in ‘BRICS’? The BRICS certainly want to engage with Africa yet the consensus is that it is up to the continent to determine how it wants to use its platform to navigate the international system – and many questions remain unanswered. Rebecca Ramsamy, ECDPM's Young International Professional and former intern with SAIIA, reports on discussions at a recent Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung conference.
  • A fresh approach to credit ratings
    Written by
    A fresh approach to credit ratings Over the past few years there have been discussions amongst the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries to open up their own rating agency that will compete with the 'big three' credit rating agencies - that is, Standard and Poor’s (S&P), Moody’s and the Fitch Group. S&P and Moody’s are based in the US.
  • South Africa’s Place in an Economic Global Order
    Written by
    South Africa’s Place in an Economic Global Order Without question South Africa remains a vibrant, complicated and seemingly a growing troubled land. My colleagues from the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) one of the premiere think tanks in South Africa and the University of Pretoria, particularly the Department of Political Science there brought together some of their South African colleagues with experts from a number of countries for a conference (December 4th-5th) titled “Alliances Beyond BRICS:…
  • The G-20 Tax Agenda and Africa's Needs
    Written by
    The G-20 Tax Agenda and Africa's Needs The importance of taxation goes far beyond providing income to finance the public sector, investments, and the basic needs of the population. The establishment of states is partly attributed to the tax system which has also contributed to promoting the state’s legitimacy, strengthening democracy, as well as to creating economic well-being for the general population.
  • A good week for global governance
    A good week for global governance For global governance watchers, last week was the big week of the year. Between 7 November and 16 November, the world witnessed an APEC meeting in Yanqi Lake near Beijing complete with a bilateral China–Japan ‘breakthrough’ and a major US–China climate deal; an historic ASEAN and East Asia Summit held in Naypidaw, Myanmar; and a colourful G-20 meeting in Brisbane, Australia.
  • Africa’s hope at Brisbane G-20 Summit
    Africa’s hope at Brisbane G-20 Summit The 2014 annual summit of the group of 20 (G-20) developed and emerging economies comes up from 15 to 16 November in the Australian city of Brisbane. As usual, the leaders of the G-20 countries will be deliberating on issues that will have ramifications for not only their respective economies but also the rest of the world, including those who will not be represented at the deliberations.
  • G-20 and Africa: Time for More Effective Participation
    G-20 and Africa: Time for More Effective Participation The Group of 20 (G-20) will hold its ninth Leaders Summit in Brisbane, Australia next week.  Around the table are expected to be three African Heads of State from South Africa, Mauritania and Senegal. South Africa is the only permanent African member of this prestigious group that is the self-styled pre-eminent forum on global economic governance issues.
  • The 2014 G-20 Summit: Maximising growth, revenue and stability
    Written by
    The 2014 G-20 Summit: Maximising growth, revenue and stability Group of 20 (G-20) Summits are a magnet for expectations. Ever since the grouping was formed in the turbulent early days of the 2008 global financial crisis major stakeholders have pinned many hopes on the ability of the group to steer the globe back to growth.

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